Guide to Self-Contained Camper conversion New Zealand

Image
AutoTrader NZ
Author
Published 17 May 2021

Wanting to hit the NZ roads in your very own converted camper but don’t know where to start? We’ve put together a guide of everything you need to know to get self-contained certified in New Zealand.

By law in New Zealand, you will need a self-contained certification (NZS 5465:2001) for your camper conversion, this means that your camper does not require external facilities like a water source, rubbish disposal and toilet. 

Who can issue a self-contained certification in NZ?

There are many self-contained certification providers in New Zealand, they are normally plumbers. Self Contained NZ has an online booking option and NZ Lifestyle Camping has a full list of providers for the North and South Island. 

What will you need?

  • A freshwater tank: 12L per person,  which equals three days of water (for example, if your camper sleeps two people, you will need a 24L water container), a Jerry Can works well for this.
  • A grey/black waste water tank: 12L per person, which equals three days of water (for example, if your camper is set up for two people, you will require a 24L tank).
  • All water tanks must have vents, allowing water to flow easily.
  •  A rubbish bin with a lid, any size will do for this, however it does need to be fixed to the vehicle. 
  • A toilet (portable or fixed). Needs to have a minimum of 3L per person for three days and be able to be used inside the campervan with the bed made up.

  • A sink tap: a hand pumped tap for drinking water works well.
  • Evacuation hose (3m for fitted tanks) or long enough to connect to a sealed portable tank. This is only if the tank is permanently fixed to your vehicle.
  • A sink connected to a smell trap/water trap, and then a watertight, sealed waste water tank. Here is how they work:

Van Conversion Kits

If you’re not keen on sourcing all of the supplies for the conversion yourself, Van Lifer NZ offers flatpack kitsets. They have a great user friendly website with completely customisable options, including plumbing and electric upgrades. They even offer installation and a self containment certification right from their workshop.

Which van models make a great camper?

Medium Sized Vans:

Toyota Hiace 

Average Price Range: $10,000 to $55,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Petrol and Diesel options available

Cargo Space: 6 cubic for the earlier models (up to 2018) and 6.2 cubic metres from 2019 onwards

View all available Toyota Hiaces on Auto Trader

Volkswagen Transporter 

Average Price Range: $40,000 to $70,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Petrol and Diesel options available

Cargo Space: 5.8 cubic metres

View all available Volkswagen Transporters on Auto Trader

Nissan NV350

Average Price Range: $20,000 to $45,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Petrol and Diesel options available

Cargo Space: 6 cubic metres

View all available Nissan NV350s on Auto Trader

Large Vans: 

Ford Transit 

Average Price Range: $15,000 to $100,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Diesel 

Cargo Space: 15.1 cubic metres

View all available Ford Transits on Auto Trader

Volkswagen Crafter

Average Price Range: $50,000 to $100,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Diesel

Cargo Space: 18.4 cubic metres

View all available Volkswagen Crafters on Auto Trader

Mercedes-Benz Sprinter

Average Price Range: $50,000 to $100,000 depending on year and kms

Fuel Type: Diesel

Cargo Space: 17 cubic metres

View all available Mercedes-Benz Sprinters on Auto Trader